Compassionate In Home Care Los Angeles Services

Receiving care in the home is an understandably appealing recommendation for many when they get to a point in their life where they can no more take care of themselves without assistance. In home care services are also seen as a more cost effective option.

Home care services can provide a large number of benefits – and not just for the recipients of care either. Of course, the main reason, as with all types of care, is to get a good quality level of care during difficult times.

Following are some of the benefits that In Home Care Los Angeles services can provide patients:

No Stressful Moves.
Being faced with a totally new environment is quite tough; when suffering from an illness it’s made considerably more troublesome. The change of moving into a residential care home can turn out to be stressful for someone receiving care. It’s not always essential either. In Home care services enable patients to stay in a place they know � means their own home. It also permits them to be surrounded by their belongings and memories – which can turn out to be comforting during a difficult time. There may come a period when a residential care facility, with its specialist care equipment is an absolute need. But during the early days, it’s well worth opting for home care services.

Remain Close To Family and Friends.
When suffering from an ailment or life-limiting condition, a visit from relatives and friends can mean an awful lot. Seeing these familiar faces on a regular basis can provide a great boost to someone when they are sick. Home care services enable them to keep visiting on a regular basis – at any time of the day. On the other hand, residential care homes have set specific visiting hours, meaning that arranging an on-the-fly visit simply isn’t possible.

Build Up Companionship.
The home care service providers are primarily there to administer care, but they will also look to create a bond and build up compatibility with the person they are caring for. For people who have been left housebound by their sickness, this could have a positive effect, giving them with someone to talk to on a human level � rather than an endless slew of medical jargon.

Freedom Of Choice.
With home care services there are a large number of different types available. For example, live in care services are customized for those with more severe care needs. Under such circumstances, the carer might move into the patient’s home to manage care.

There are plenty of excellent home care services available in cities and towns across the country. With a little research and the advice of others who have already been through this process, you should be able to find a quality home care service provider that takes good care of your loved ones. In Home Care Los Angeles provide a range of quality home care services, from senior care to highly specialized nursing care for all ages. The goal is to enable clients to live happy lives that are physically and emotionally fulfilling.

Effective Leading, Managing and Supervising – What It Takes

If you search for “effective leadership” on the Internet, you come upon 1,680,000 hits. “Effective management” produces a list of 4,060,000 sites and “effective supervision” points to 237,0000 references. Amazon lists over 10,000 books on leadership, managing and supervising. One would think that most organizational leaders, managers and supervisors would have, by now, internalized enough information about effective leadership, management and supervision to take their rightful place in the Great Leaders, Managers and Supervisors Hall of Fame. Unfortunately, this is not the case.In spite of the wealth of information, many leaders, managers and supervisors are challenged when it comes to a clear understanding of what it is that defines high performance.Businesses, groups and organizations spend billions of dollars every year on education, training and development for leaders, managers and supervisors often with less-than-expected appreciable outcomes. There’s certainly no dearth of training and development programs, workshops, seminars, and courses. The reality is that so many of these efforts are too involved, too complex, too unwieldy or far too simple to create any positive, practical and long-lasting change or transformation.So, the question remains: “What in fact works when it comes to developing high performance leaders managers and supervisors?”In my coaching experiences over the years, I’ve found five qualities that characterize high performance leaders, managers and supervisors. These qualities most often permeate the workplace context and culture regardless of whatever the company, organization or group is focused on: quality improvement, customer service, client relations, teamwork, process improvement, etc.

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These five qualities are: Focus, Authenticity, Courage, Empathy and TimingFocusHigh performance leaders, managers and supervisors focus on outcomes and results. Outcomes are the beacons which guide their efforts and support them to stay on track. High performance leaders, managers and supervisors communicate their focus on outcomes by proactively adhering to, and living, the company, organizational or group values which are also included in their mission and vision statements. This focus on outcomes drives high performance leaders, manages and supervisors to ensure their workforce has the appropriate knowledge, skills and tools to move the organization in the direction of realized outcomes. Focus on outcomes allows high performance leaders, managers and supervisors to be resilient, responsible, change-oriented, and creative as opposed to being chained to unrealistic and unreasonable rules, regulations, and needless bureaucratic, control-oriented, policies, processes and procedures.AuthenticityAuthenticity is “showing up” as one’s true and real self, as one really is, in integrity, vulnerable, not as an imposter, not wearing masks. Authentic high performance leaders, managers and supervisors are magnetic; they attract followers who want to follow, followers who know what to expect and who are supportive, reliable and dependable in good times and in not-so-good times. Authentic leaders, managers and supervisors create a culture of openness, transparency and trust. They are open, honest and direct. And a culture of openness, honesty and trust is what creates buy-in from stakeholders.CourageLeaders, managers and supervisors today are consistently challenged by their teams, clients, customers, the public, the media and other stakeholders. Often, what’s required to face and overcome challenge is intestinal fortitude, self-discipline and courage. Courage means standing tall, firm and strong in the face of confrontation, challenge and conflict. Courage also means being able to admit one’s missteps and mistakes. Courage means both making, and acting on, decisions rather than merely paying lip service to visions, ideas and plans. Courage means being demanding of others, expecting others to tell the truth and expecting others to work in integrity.EmpathyEmpathy is the ability to feel what another person is feeling, and why. It is the ability to recognize the emotions in others and to “feel with someone.” Empathic leaders, managers and supervisors are powerful listeners; they listen for understanding. They listen “at level three” above the words and even above the meaning of the words, to the feelings between and underneath the words. They care about someone “as a person.” Empathic leaders, managers and supervisors facilitate teamwork, motivate others and serve as inspirational role models for others. Empathic leaders, managers and supervisors listen to the ideas of others, and proactively acknowledge and reward others for their ideas, input and contributions.TimingIn today’s fast-paced environment, time is of the essence. With change happening at lightning speed, the timing of decisions (both making and not making decisions) is critical to the success or failure of business. None of the four qualities mentioned will lead to high performance leadership, managing or supervising, if poor decision-making is sabotaging the organization. High performance leaders, managers and supervisors are consciously conscious of when and how to act. They have their finger on the “pulse of the clock” and know when to act, when to wait, and when to defer. They know not only how to plan, organize, prioritize and execute but, more importantly, when.

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So, some $10 food for thought questions are:· On a scale of 1-10, how focused am I?· Do I walk our mission-vision-values talk?· Do I inspire others? How do I know?· Do I support others to focus? How so?· Do I perpetuate needless and outdated bureaucracies, processes, policies and procedures?· Do people see me as being authentic? How do I know. How do I feel about asking my colleagues if they perceive me as being authentic? If not, what’s my resistance all about?· Am I the same person at work as I am when I’m standing naked in my bedroom at 4:00 in the morning when no one can see me? Am I really two different people? Do I wear masks? If so, why?· Do I live the courage of my convictions? Do I wilt under criticism?· How do I act when I’m wrong and I know it?· On a scale of 1-10, how empathic am I? Would others agree with me?· Do I “listen to” or “hear” others? Do I know the difference?· Do I promote a sense of community and inclusiveness in my workplace?· Do I foster open and honest dialogue? If not, why not?· Do I make and execute decisions in a timely manner?· Am I creating a culture of high performance?· How do I feel after asking myself these questions? Did I have the courage to answer honestly, sincerely and self-responsibly?

The Ongoing Demographic Challenge: Bringing Boomer Managers and Generation Y Together

Generalizations about the various cohorts in the workplace today (Traditionalists, Boomers, Generation X and Generation Y) result in stereotypical views by each cohort of the members of the other cohorts. Understanding what defines each of these cohorts and their stereotypes will help members of these cohorts learn to work together more effectively by reducing the misunderstandings and conflict that arises. Demographic research tells us approximately 40% of the management and senior level positions in our organizations are held by Boomers and that currently 50% of the employees in the workforce are Boomers, so this stereotype is fairly well developed. As the decade progresses, this dominant cohort will be replaced by the next largest cohort, Generation Y, two workplace generations behind Boomers. This creates a workplace (defined as all places where work – profit and not for profit work is done) of misunderstanding and conflict if not addressed by organizational leaders.To further clarify the ongoing demographic challenge, let’s first look at the stereotypes.The Boomer Stereotype:
I am a member of the baby boomer cohort, those born between 1947 and 1966. This means I was raised during the 1950’s and 60’s and, in general terms, I am a member of the generation whose moral and political orientation (during their formative years) was significantly affected by the birth control pill and the Vietnam War.I entered the workforce as a highly educated professional during the 1980’s. I have held many management and leadership positions during the past thirty years and I love to work. I define myself by the work I do, hence; retirement is not in my immediate future.I was born into an affluent society – an abundant, healthy economy – where post secondary education was open to all those interested. I achieved two degrees and still, to this day, I like to see these degrees highlighted on my CV. I work to live and live to work so it makes perfect sense that my work defines me, my self worth and my view of others’ self worth. I expect others to have the same work ethic as I do.My working style is competitive so I am results-focused, I like to set goals and then action plans to achieve those goals. I expect to be rewarded for goal achievement and I am career driven, seeking regular promotions. My work defines me so, of course, I am very interested in job security.When it comes to my communication skills, I am considered a digital immigrant which means I had to learn email, internet, and social media on the job, as an adult. I prefer face to face communication but I have learned the value of digital discourse and accept it as part of the ongoing business experience.As I progress toward retirement, I am interested in continuing to live a results-oriented life with results focused around my personal goals – travel, health and wellness and, spending time with my grandchildren.Today, as I continue to function as a manager and leader in the workforce, my biggest challenge is the newest entrant – Generation Y or Milennials. Within less than a decade, my cohort will have decreased in size by 50% and Generation Y will have increased by 100%. They will become the dominant cohort in the workplace, replacing my cohort as the managers and business leaders for 2020 and beyond. And herein lies the ongoing demographic challenge.

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They are not like me!The Generation Y Stereotype:
Generation Y are members of the cohort born between 1980 and 1995. This means they were raised by baby boomer parents – parents who belong to the dominant societal cohort, a cohort that likes to spend well and live well. Generation Y has a close relationship with these boomer parents and will spend a significant part of their early adult years back at home with their parents. Their generational markers are defined by technology, specifically mobile technology and social media.They, like the boomers, have been born into an affluent society – an abundant, healthy economy – where post secondary education is open to all those interested. Most have achieved at least one degree, many have achieved more. But they do not define themselves by the work they do. The line between their personal and professional lives is blurred and their self-worth comes from how they are viewed by their friends and colleagues. They are collegial by nature and believe everyone is equal. They want a workplace where hard work and career aspiration translates into rapid advancement. They are loyal to their ‘community’ and they view work as part of the life continuum.If Boomers are digital immigrants then Generation Y are digital natives. These ‘sidewalk zombies’ (those who multitask by walking and texting at the same time unaware of what is going on around them on the street) have been raised with technology and, at a young age, had access to cellular technology. By the time they entered the workforce, they had graduated to smartphone technology – at home and at work. Their community is one of friends, many of whom they have never met. They need to be connected during all waking moments via social media – Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc.Within less than a decade, this cohort will double and they will become the dominant cohort in the workplace. They will overshadow the working preferences, desires and needs of Generation X – the cohort sandwiched between Boomers and Generation Y and, unfortunately for them, a cohort half the size of both the Boomer and Generation Y cohorts – and herein lies the ongoing demographic challenge for Generation Y.I am not like them!If we look closely at these two cohorts, there are actually more similarities than differences. Although the generational markers (formative events during the teen and early adult years that members of a cohort share) are significantly different, both were raised in an affluent society. Both cohorts are self-indulgent, independent and self-reliant. Both are highly educated and believe in hard work. Both expect access to the career ladder and expect their skills and knowledge to be recognized and their contribution rewarded. So if they are really not that different, why does the demographic challenge exist?Because perception is reality. Boomers perceive Generation Y as demanding with unrealistic expectations about their role in the workplace. Boomers respect authority and value the hierarchical nature of most organizations – work hard, do your time, get results and you will be rewarded with promotion. Generation Y questions authority and wants to make their own choices – get an education, excel at technology, expect more from your employer, work hard and you will be rewarded with promotion at a fast pace. Generation Y’s perception of Boomers is one of a financially driven group- both as employees and consumers. They view Boomer managers as authoritarian and not open to change. Boomers question Generation Y’s penchant to spend working time on social media sites and expecting to be able to bring their personal smartphones to work and use them for both work and personal applications. As Boomers stay in the workforce and delay retirement, Generation Y feels potential jobs and promotions are denied to them.So what can we do to address these perceptions and bring Boomer Managers and Generation Y employees closer together – to get both cohorts focused on working together for professional and personal performance growth? Here are three steps that members of both cohorts can apply – leveraging the similarities and reducing the effect of their differences. Educate yourself to minimize erroneous perceptions and develop an appreciation for members of the other cohort. Boomer managers need to invest time and effort to fully understand the preferences and working styles of Generation Y. This will provide them with important information when seeking to create an environment where current employees are retained and future employees are recruited. Boomers should take this opportunity to learn about the differences, how to work with them, how to incorporate them into their role as leaders. The Boomer ‘leadership’ philosophy, if based in change management concepts,will set the stage and provide the tools they need to develop future leaders and keep expertise within the organization.Generation Y employees or recruitment candidates should invest time and effort in not only raising their awareness of the organization but also, awareness of those who lead and manage the organization. Developing an awareness for the skills, knowledge and experience acquired by Boomers over their many years of service, will provide Generation Y with the information they need to determine who, in the organization, is best positioned to help them learn and grow. Generation Y are interested in organizations that encourage growth and development of their employees, so they should be seeking out those types of organizations and determining how best to mine the expertise of the Boomer managers in those organizations.
Get to Know One Another – it’s all about building relationships. Boomers are considered to be the ultimate networkers. They have developed a considerable network of professional and personal contacts both within the profit and not for profit sectors. They favour face to face interaction and communication and through this vehicle they have learned how to build lasting relationships, understanding the value of relationships to grow the customer base and grow the business. Surely they could apply this knowledge and expertise to building relationships with members of Generation Y. Generation Y may be new to the concept of networking, as implemented by Boomers, but they certainly know how to network online and build a community of like-minded people. The line between their personal and professional communities are blurred so they don’t tend to differentiate between who is in their specific community. They are also pack-oriented, preferring to play and work within a team or group. So relationships, to them, are also key. The difference may only be in the manner in which they build these relationships. By getting to know one another and how they like to work, most likely these two cohorts will find they are both good at building relationships and share their best practices.
Build a Mentoring Partnership – what are your skills and knowledge you can share with another? Mentoring is an investment of time and effort but it is also best when both parties have something substantial in common such as an interest in a particular skill, position or knowledge area. The key to an effective mentor relationship is that both parties need to be getting something out of the relationship. Reverse mentoring or social-techno mentoring – where Boomers are mentored in the technological skills and knowledge held by Generation Y and Generation Y are mentored in management and leadership skills and knowledge held by Boomers – will take both cohorts a long way to building the relationships necessary to destroy the stereotypes.

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To best understand our current workplace environment and predict future trends, it is necessary to ‘lump’ members of generations into groups defined by their generational markers. We can not look, as leaders, researchers, evaluators of trends, or predictors of the future, only at individuals. We have to generalize and these generalizations can lead to stereotyping groups of people. If the generational cohorts in the workplace take the time and effort to get to know one another, their skills, knowledge and expertise, and be open to sharing their ideas with other cohorts, then the ongoing demographic challenge between Boomers and Generation Y should turn into an ongoing opportunity to build productive relationships.

Liquid Stevia Sweetener is the Healthy Alternative to Sugar

A individual looking for wholesome, low carb foods have to be aware about liquid stevia sweetener, the definitely herbal zero calorie alternative for sugar or artificial sweeteners. A good sized majority of research, checks, and articles regarding stevia have concluded that it can be the one sweetener that is in reality useful for people. It has been found that liquid stevia can help wholesome people hold regular blood sugar ranges, and it’s miles a 0 calorie sweetener, that is exceptional news for diabetics.

To start with, allow’s test the origins of stevia and the way it has received the spotlight with the upward thrust in demand for low carb foods and more healthy substitutes for sugar and synthetic sweeteners. Stevia has been implemented for generations via local South American tribes as a sweetener of their herbal teas and other health beverages in addition to for treating heartburn and different illnesses. Stevia is a bush within the Chrysanthemum circle of relatives, which grows wild in components of Paraguay and Brazil. The plant’s extracts have up to 300 times the beauty of sugar, but have a negligible importance on blood glucose. That is why liquid stevia sweetener is gaining the spotlight as a healthy sugar substitute that may help human beings maintain regular blood sugar tiers.

Since the early 1970’s, Japan has led the way in developing stevia as an alternative for artificial sweeteners which include aspartame, that are reputed cancer agents. Manufactured in Japan considering the fact that 1977, stevia sweeteners are frequently used in that country for low carb meals and gentle drinks. Japan currently debts for pretty much 40% of the sector’s intake of stevia sweetener, more than any other united states. It is now usually used for the duration of the arena, drastically in East Asia, South America and Israel. Stevia has been presented as a nutritional supplement in North America for the reason that mid ‘eighty’s. It registers zero at the Glycemic index, such a lot of clever customers global at the moment are the usage of liquid stevia sweetener to enhance the taste of herbal health beverages that don’t incorporate sugar or artificial sweeteners.

In 1984, Dr. Tei-Fu Chen, an American herbalist from Taiwan, invented a technique to extract the wonder from stevia with out the use of chemicals. This approach is acknowledged today because the maximum favorable manner to create stevia products for consumption. Dr. Chen’s organization, Sunrider, victoriously petitioned the FDA in 1995 to lift the import alert at the extract of stevia leaves. Sunrider became one of the earliest businesses to introduce liquid stevia to the market with the product Sunectar, in 1984, and later a version called SunnyDew.